FAQ’s Bariatric Treatment Chair

FAQ’s Bariatric Treatment Chair

  1. What can the chair be used for? It is a dental treatment chair and can be used on patients for all head and leg procedures. Typical procedures would be ophthalmic, ENT, and dental on the upper body and podiatry and diabetic leg conditions for the lower body. The poor circulation in the legs for diabetic patients is typical of the bariatric patient community and the Bariatric Treatment Chair directly addresses their requirement in capacity and procedural needs.  
  2. What weight will it take? The safe working load is 100lbs (454kg, 71 stone). Of course we test to a much higher value but loading the equipment to 1 metric tonne is a bit of a problem. So we take it to 600kg and assess the full loading to by analysis.
  3. How wide is it? The seat is 31.5” wide (800mm) plenty wide enough for the largest people. We offer a set of side cushions to reduce the width to 600mm to make it more comfortable for regular patients. The whole chair is 39.5” (1m) wide so needs a wide door if you wish to move it from room to room.
  4. Can it be moved around? Yes, there is a small battery pneumatic pump that lifts the unit on eight bearing pods by 0.6” (15mm). The chair can then be pushed around to a parking place. To lower the chair a valve is turned to dump the pressured air – all very easy.
  5. How low and high does it go? We have taken the standard seat height of 20”(500mm) for the lowest and a rise of 20”” (500mm) to the highest. This give the greatest height of 39” (1000mm) to enable foot treatment on the soles without having to bend down. It follows that the lowest head height for dental or ophthalmic treatment is 20” (500mm).
  6. Does the leg support move IN/OUT? Yes, as the skin condition of some bariatric patients is not good any sliding that causes skin drag is to be avoided. The timing of the IN and OUT movement is adjusted to minimise this skin drag.
  7. How do you adjust for different patient heights? The backrest can be adjusted in height. A button on the backrest allows the height to be raised or lowered to suit the patient.  This means that the patient is supported on the important shoulder blade position and is not required to adjust position to suit a fixed height backrest.
  8. Is there any allowance made for the patient sliding on the backrest when they are lowered? Yes, using one of the control buttons the backrest will move downwards during the recline process. This keeps the head in a fixed position on the headrest and avoids any sliding.
  9. How are large patients catered for as they cannot easily change position when seated? The low seat height allows the patient to sit without difficulty and the substantial armrests can take any load required to give support. The backrest can be adjusted in height and moves inwards as the backrest is reclined. This combined movement ensures that the patient does not have to adjust position to suit a fixed backrest when reclined.
  10. Can the armrests be moved away? No, this is a considered decision. The armrest need to give confidence to the patient and any movement will undermine this. The armrests are structural and substantial. Access to the patient is not compromised as the backrest and legrest extend well beyond the armrest position.